This Simple Fitness Test Can Predict Your Longevity

Image from Prevention.com

Image from Prevention.com

We sit down and stand up dozens of times each day without even thinking about it. But how easily we can lower ourselves and rise back up could be a good indicator as to how physically fit we are and more importantly, how long we might live.. Woah. This just got real.

Image is from Discovermagazine.com

Image is from Discovermagazine.com

So here is how you do it: Trying sitting down on the floor (this is best not for the office), without touching your knees, legs, hands or arms to the floor. Then try getting back up the same way - unaided without using any of your extremities to help you.

The maximum score you can receive is 10 points. 5 for sitting and 5 for standing unaided. For each body part that you leaned on (say you put down a handle to break your fall, or used your knee to aid you up) you lose a point. If you used a hand and a knee, that's minus 2 points. And if you wobbled, that's -.5 points. Damn this scoring is harsh.

Image from Discovermagazine.com

Image from Discovermagazine.com

If you scored 10 points, good for you. Quit showing off, just know that you are fit and healthy and probably won't croke anytime soon. If you bit it and crash landed or flailed and rolled about on the floor trying to get up like a upside down turtle, you need to hit the gym to work on your core strength.

That's because according to Brazilian researchers in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, your score matches well with your risk of death. People who scored zero to three were 6.5 times as likely to die during the course of the study, compared to people who scored from 8 to 10. Those who had scores of 3.5 to 5.5 were 3.8 times as likely to die as the high scorers -- and those who scored 6 to 7.4 range were 1.8 times more likely to die than those with the highest scores. 

According to Claudio Gil Soares de Araujo, a Brazilian professor and one of the authors of the study, while this test best tested for the ratio of muscle power to body weight, “other very relevant issues including body flexibility, balance, and motor coordination."

Don't know about you, but we'll be right back after our 4 hour core training session in the gym...

Moral of the Story: Being fit and active is incredibly important. Knowing your health and actively working to improve your core strength is critical to a long and healthy life.